When railway wagons were built on the Crescent

The railway carriage below, built by Tweedale and Barton for the Stockton and Darlington line in 1846, is preserved in the National Collection.

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The Bush Hotel stables were on Blackfriars Street and this is where Thomas Tweedale set up as a coach builder in 1826 with a partner, William Barton. In 1840 a move was made to the Crescent, extending back along Warwick Road. In 1844 the partners won the contract to supply railway waggons (like the one shown below) for the Maryport and Carlisle Railway. They also built some of the passenger carriages. The railway carriage below, built by Tweedale and Barton for the Stockton and Darlington line in 1846, is preserved in the National Collection.

In 1836 the construction of Victoria Viaduct crossed Blackfriars Street just south of the Bush Hotel stables, later demolished to be replaced by a corner building at the junction of the two streets.

In 1877, this became a branch of Carrs’ Bread and Flour Company, with offices above. (See feature image.)

Much more about the history of Blackfriars Street over the years is to be found in the book of that name available at local bookshops, Bookends, Tullie, and Carlisle Visitor Centre.

David Ramshaw
Author: David Ramshaw

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